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Maths

Arithmetic:

 

1)  56 + 37 = ___                        7)  89 - 72 = ___

 

2)  3 x 2 = ___                           8)  45 + ___ = 55

 

3)  6 x 10 = ___                          9)  13 + ___ = 20

 

4)  Double 11 = ___                     10) 14 ÷ 2 = ___

 

5)  9 ÷ 3 = ___                            11)  6 x 5 = ___

 

6)  17 - 5 = ___                           12) 40 + ___ = 100

BBC Bitesize: Maths - What are fractions?

Find out how you can use fractions to split a whole number into halves or quarters.

Monday

WALT: identify unit fractions.

 

What is a fraction?

A fraction tells you how many parts of a whole you have. Let's take a look at some different fractions. When you divide something into two equal parts, each part is called a half. When you divide a whole object into four equal parts, each part is called a quarter.

 

Fractions are shown by having one number on top of another, for example: ¼

You would pronounce this fraction as either 'one quarter' or 'one over four' or 'one out of four.'

  • The top number is called a numerator. This shows how many parts you have (1 in this example).

  • The bottom number is called a denominator. This shows you how many parts the whole object has been divided into (4 in this example).

 

What is a unit fraction?

A unit fraction is a fraction where the numerator (the number on the top of the fraction) is 1. The denominator (on the bottom) can be any other whole number. A good way to remember it is by remembering that unit means 1! Here are some examples of unit fractions: ½¼ and ¹⁄₁₀

Tuesday

WALT: identify non-unit fractions.

 

What is a non-unit fraction?

A non-unit fraction is a fraction where the numerator (the top number) is greater than 1. The denominator (the bottom number) can be any whole number. Here are some examples of non-unit fractions: ⁷⁄₁₂ and ¾

Wednesday

WALT: find a half of a shape or an amount.

 

Remember what you have learnt so far this week about fractions. A fraction tells you how many parts of a whole you have. Fractions are shown by having one number on top of another, for example:

 

There are two parts to a fraction:

  • The number on top, called the numerator, shows how many parts you have (1 in this example).
  • The number on the bottom, called the denominator, shows how many parts something has been divided equally into (2 in this example).

 

½ means '1 part of something' that has been 'divided into 2 equal parts'. We call this a half. If you add two halves together you get one whole: ½ + ½ = 1

 

 

Treasure Hunt

Try this fun treasure hunt activity from Maths with Parents to explore finding halves of an amount.

 

1. Ask your child to collect piles of different items from around the house, such as:

  • building blocks
  • teddies
  • shoes
  • pencils

They will need to collect more than one of each item.

 

2. Put the items in a pile and then challenge your child to share each pile equally between the two of you.

  • Some piles of objects will be shared out in whole numbers, but you might have some interesting conversations about why this isn’t true for all numbers of things.

  • Do they notice anything about the numbers which end up with you having a different number of items each?

 

3. Once your child has shared the items between you, ask them to count each item to make sure that you have half each.

Try this activity from NRICH to explore ways of finding half of a shape.

The images below show squares split in half:

  • How might you check that each was correct?
  • Can you think of more ways to split a square into two halves?

You can use a sheet of paper to work out your answers or a small white board and a ruler if you have them.

Thursday

WALT: find a quarter of a shape or an amount.

 

We have been learning about fractions all this week. Some important facts to remember. A fraction tells you how many parts of a whole you have. Fractions are shown by having one number on top of another, for example: ¼

 

There are two parts to a fraction:

  • The number on top, called the numerator, shows how many parts you have (1 in this example).
  • The number on the bottom, called the denominator, shows how many parts something has been divided equally into (4 in this example).

 

¼ means '1 part of something' that has been 'divided into 4 equal parts'. We call this a quarter. If you add four quarters together you get one whole: ¼ + ¼ + ¼ + ¼ = 1

Sharing Shapes

Copy the shapes below on a piece of paper or download the pdf to print. See if you can shade in ¼ of each shape. The example below shows one possible solution.

  • Can you think of any other ways to quarter this shape?

  • Which shapes were the easiest to shade in?

  • Which ones were the most difficult?

  • Can you find more than one way to shade in each shape?

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